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Tag Archives: smartphones

Project Tango: From Gesture Sensing to Machine Vision

Project Tango was announced in February 2014. It is a special project from Google’s ATAP (Advanced Technology and Projects, formerly part of Motorola) and Movidius, a startup in Silicon Valley. When Google sold Motorola (Mobility) to Lenovo, it held on to ATAP. Continue Reading

A Tizen Smartphone Finally Arriving After Two Years?

Since the establishment of the Tizen Association in 2012, the mobile industry had been expecting a Tizen-powered smartphone from Samsung that would work on networks such as NTTDoCoMo, Orange, and Vodafone. Tizen, originally called the LiMo Foundation, is supported by various handset manufacturers and operators, as well as Intel, who are looking for a 3rd mobile OS to hedge against heavy reliance on Google’s Android and/or Apple’s iOS. Continue Reading

HD and FHD Smartphones Ramping Quickly in 2014

Display resolution in smartphones is changing rapidly. In our Smartphone Quarterly report, we forecast that HD (720×1280) and FHD (1080×1920) resolution smartphones are growing the fastest this year. The key drivers are adoption of LTE, application processor development, and display cost reductions. However, driver ICs could be a limiting factor for high resolution displays. Continue Reading

Displays and the Connected Consumer

Until recently, in order for marketers and advertisers to “interact” with consumers in public environments such as retail stores, supermarkets, and museums, digital signage networks relied on kiosks, touch-enabled commercial displays, and projectors featuring gesture-based controls, among others. Continue Reading

Flexible AMOLEDs: At the Tipping Point?

“At the tipping point” was the theme of the Flexible & Printed Electronics Conference held this week in Phoenix Arizona. The releases of the Samsung Galaxy Round and LG G Flex flexible AMOLED based smartphones in late 2013 were widely cited throughout the conference as evidence that flexible display technology has finally reached critical mass. Continue Reading